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MOVIE REVIEW: Get Out this week and see Get Out!

They’re an attractive young couple, Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) and Rose (Allison Williams). She who is white, assures him as they plan a visit to meet her parents, that they won’t care that he’s black. She adds that her father would have voted for Obama for a third term. When they arrive at the Rose’s parents’ stately home in its picturesque, bucolic setting, her father, Dean (Bradley Whitford) and her mother, Missy (Catherine Keener) greet Chris and extend their best efforts to make him feel comfortable. Chris also hears it straight from Dean: he would have voted for Obama for a third term. But after his first night there, Chris begins to realize that there are some occurrences that go way beyond the expected awkwardness of his being in Rose’s family home.

As I left the theater after seeing Get Out, I found myself thinking of the title of the New Zealand group OMC’s hit song, How Bizarre. While the film’s genre is horror, and it contains all the elements of that genre, there is so much more to this story. That’s what makes this film exceptional is it takes a common format and intertwines issues of race in the form of stereotypes about black men and white women, and the physical attributes of black people, to create a truly unique film going experience. And that makes it a See It!

Written and directed by comedian Jordan Peele, who takes viewers on an entertaining journey giving them clues to the underlying mystery and then fits all of the pieces together in some expected and unexpected ways. Additionally, the cinematography effectively enriches so many of the scenes and is a key to telling this fascinating story.

Get Out has some familiar horror film flaws. Chris, like many protagonists in this type of film, is sometimes a little slow to figure things.

There are other defects as well. Chris shares his growing-up experience which is a key to some of his reactions. He never knew his father and lost his mother to a hit and run accident when he was 11-years-old. And at one point he tells Rose, she is all he has. The problem with that scenario is 11-year-olds don’t raise themselves. Further, he’s a fairly polished young man and an accomplished photographer, indicating that at least one if not more adults invested time and money in his development. It’s unlikely that those “investors” would have disappeared from Chris’ life now that he is an adult, resulting in Rose being all he has.

As I discussed in my review of Fences, it is troubling that the ubiquitous portrayal of black families as dysfunctional is a theme often perpetuated by black writers. Peele creates Chris’s story as one with an absentee father, even though Peele’s own father was in his life.

As to cast diversity, Get Out gets an “A-“. When it comes to black and white characters, you won’t find a more diverse film. However, there is only one Asian-American and one Hispanic, each with a small speaking role.

Get Out is Rated R for violence, bloody images, language and sexual references, and is 104 minutes in length. Get Out is a unique film you’ll think about and talk about. And it’s a See It!

Movie Review: This Stork Doesn't Deliver

Storks deliver babies...or at least they used to. In this story, these birds are out of the baby business and now, deliver packages for a global internet giant, Cornerstore.com. Junior, the company's top delivery stork, is about to be promoted when he accidentally activates the previously out of commission, Baby Making Machine, producing an adorable and wholly unauthorized baby girl. Desperate to deliver this bundle of trouble before the boss gets wise, Junior and his friend Tulip, the only human on Stork Mountain, race to make their first-ever baby drop - in a challenging journey that could make more than one family whole and restore the stork's true mission in the world.

Storks never takes off and gets a Dead on Arrival rating. It deals with too many plotlines. None of which are especially interesting. And even in an animated feature, the characters need to have some level of depth, they don't here. I understand that this type of film is for kids. Halfway through the movie, my 12-year-old daughter whispered to me, "This is awful!"

Additionally, this theater with a lot of children was very quiet which is not usually the case when they are enjoying the movie. In a good animated film, children's laughter dominates the facility.

Character voices are by: Andy Samberg, Kelsey Grammer, Jennifer Anniston, Keegan Michael Key, and Jordan Peele.

Animated films generally do very well at the box office. Thus far in 2016, of the 10 Top Grossing Films, five are animated features. However, animation is not enough; the story has to have entertainment value. And, entertainment wise, Storks never gets off the ground, so it's Dead on Arrival.

Storks is rated PG for mild action and some thematic elements and is 89 minutes in length.

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